12 Strategies to Beat ADHD Naturally

12 Strategies to Beat ADHD Naturally

BeatADHDCover

12 Strategies to Beat ADHD Naturally

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently surveyed 73,000 children and found one in 10 has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).   This is a 22% increase since 2003.  Approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with ADHD as of 2011 (1).

Boys (13.2%) were more likely than girls (5.6%) to have ever been diagnosed with ADHD.  The average age of ADHD diagnosis was 7 years of age, but children reported by their parents as having more severe ADHD were diagnosed earlier.  Prevalence of ADHD diagnosis varied substantially by state, from a low of 5.6% in Nevada to a high of 18.7% in Kentucky.

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ADHD and Delayed Development:

Studies using brain imaging have shown that children with ADHD have a delayed brain maturation by about 3 years (2).  The delay is most pronounced in brain regions involved in thinking, attention, focus and planning.

Some of the most significant maturation delays are in the outermost layer of the brain, the cortex and in particular the frontal lobe of the cortex (3, 4).  The corpus colosum, which is key for proper communications between the 2 hemispheres of the brain is also shown to have an abnormal growth pattern in children with ADHD, sensory processing disorders and dyslexia (5, 6, 7).

Neurotransmitter Regulation and ADHD

Molecular genetic studies have identified several genes that may mediate susceptibility to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A consensus of the literature suggests that when there is a dysfunction in the “brain reward cascade,” especially in the dopamine system, causing a low or hypo-dopaminergic trait, the brain may require dopamine for individuals to avoid unpleasant feelings (8, 9).

This high-risk genetic trait leads to multiple drug-seeking behaviors, because the drugs activate release of dopamine, which can diminish abnormal cravings. Moreover, this genetic trait is due in part to a form of a gene (DRD2 A1 allele) that prevents the expression of the normal laying down of dopamine receptors in brain reward sites (1011, 12).

Other studies have shown issues with the ability of the enzyme dopamine beta hydroxylase which catalyzes dopamine into norepinephrine and the norepinephrine transporter enzyme which is involved in the reuptake of norepinphrine into the synaptic terminals (13, 14).

Additional research has looked at dysfunctions in the serotonin and GABA pathways and the relationship to ADHD (15, 16).  Serotonin and GABA are both necessary for calming the brain and inhibiting distracting stimuli. It is obvious from this research that genetic polymorphysisms and developmental challenges with neurotransmitter function are critical factors in ADHD.

ADHD and Birthing Medications:

Children who were exposed to anesthesic medications in their first 2 years of life are at a significantly greater risk of developing ADHD (17, 18).  One study showed that children exposed to anesthesia in the first 3 years of life had twice the risk of developing ADHD than children who had not been exposed (19).

This is one of the complications of mothers choosing anesthetic medications and epidurals during their birth process.  Additionally, the medications such as pitocin (oxytocin) used for birth inductions are also linked with higher rates of ADHD (20)

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ADHD and Stimulant Medication:

Individuals with ADHD are most often prescribed stimulant medications such as ritalin, dexedrine and adderall.  These medications increase dopamine and norepinephrine levels in the brain.  These neurotransmitters are critical for goal setting, concentration and focus (21, 22).

Common side effects include restlessness, dizziness, insomnia, headache, dryness of the mouth, gastrointestinal complaints and weight loss (23).  Ritalin and Adderall are classified as  “Schedule II” drugs (along with cocaine) by the Drug Enforcement Agency to indicate drugs with a high potential for abuse (24).

ADHD and the Microbiome:

There has been a tremendous amount of research linking the gut microbiome and neurological health.  Research has indicated that low levels of healthy lactobacillus and bifidobacterium are linked with increased brain exciteability and neurological inflammation (25).

A 2013 study evaluated 742,939 children and demonstrated that those children with ADHD had a dramatic increased prevalence of constipation almost threefold higher than those without ADHD. Fecal incontinence was sixfold higher in the ADHD group, and visits to the doctor because of bowel issues was also dramatically increased in kids with ADHD.

Gut motility is a critical factor in the development and maintenance of a healthy microbiome.   Children with ADHD most often have slow motility and a proliferation of microbes that secrete neurotoxic compounds such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (26).

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Additives and Chemical Perservatives:

ADHD is commonly seen associated with an inflammatory based diet and toxic food additives, dyes and preservatives. These food industry based chemicals are mild-moderately neurotoxic.  They also have a strong synergistic affect when combined with sugars such as fructose . (27, 28)

A recent Lancet study concluded that food dyes along with the preservative sodium benzoate (found in many soft drinks, fruit juices, & salad dressings) cause many children to become significantly more hyperactive and distractible.  This study also found that food additives and dyes can do as much damage to children’s brains as lead in gasoline (29).

Gluten Sensitivity and ADHD:

Gluten is the common protein molecule found in wheat, barley, rye, kamut and spelt. Gluten is a sticky storage protein that binds to the small intestinal wall where it often causes digestive and immune system disorders.

There is extensive research about gluten sensitivity and disorders in every part of the neurological system. Gluten is a significant trigger in neurodevelopmental disorders such as ADHD (30, 31).  If you have one of these issues it is critical to go 100% gluten-free.

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Anti-Inflammatory Diet:

An anti-inflammatory nutrition plan that is low in carbohydrate and rich in healthy fats and anti-oxidants is critical to preventing and treating ADHD.  The brain is primarily water, fat and cholesterol.  These are all key building blocks for promoting healthy brain function and rebuilding a damaged brain.

The proper nutrition plan to beat ADHD is rich in phytonutrient dense vegetables, healthy fat and clean protein sources.  Healthy fat sources such as coconut, avocados, olive oil & sprouted nuts and seeds must take a central role in the diet to promote healthy brain function.

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Omega 3 Fatty Acids for ADHD:

There are many key nutrients that enhance the functioning of individuals with ADHD.  Omega 3 fatty acids are perhaps the most effective nutrient in enhancing concentration and focus in ADHD individuals (32).  Omega 3 fatty acids and in particular the long chain variety EPA and DHA are critical for stabilizing blood sugar, improving neurogenesis and neurotransmitter production (33, 34).

One study found that children with ADHD had significantly lower omega 3 fatty acid content than did normal controls and the most behaviorally challenged children had the lowest levels of omega 3 in their blood and tissue (35).

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Key Nutrients for ADHD:

All of these trace minerals and B vitamins are necessary for proper neurotransmitter function.  As explained above, ADHD and other learning disorders are related to neurotransmitter dysfunctions.  Therefore, utilizing researched based nutrients to support neurotransmitter function seems appropriate and delivers proven results.

Magnesium:  Studies have shown that magnesium supplementation benefits children with ADHD.  One study showed that 50 children with ADHD and other behavioral issues had significant improvement with 6 months of 200 mg magnesium supplementation (36)

Vitamin B6:  Has been studied along with magnesium to reduce hyperexciteability, aggressiveness and behavioral problems in school aged children (37, 38).  Magnesium and B6 play a role in the development of all major neurotransmitters so it is no wonder they have such profound influence.

Folate:  Individuals with an MTHFR gene polymorphism are more likely to be deficient in folate and are at greater risk for the development of ADHD (39).  These individuals in particular need extra methyl-folate.  Individuals supplementing with L-methyl-folate have shown significant improvement in ADHD symptoms (40).

Choline:  This is a key precursor to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and it helps to regulate memory, focus and muscle control.  Individuals with ADHD may have choline transporter defects (41) and can benefit greatly from extra choline intake (42).

Zinc:  This is a key cofactor for dopamine synthesis which is key for healthy mood and concentration in ADHD.  Low zinc status depresses serotonin and melatonin production which can affect behavior and sleep.  Many people suffering with ADHD have low zinc status and supplementing with 30mg daily has shown to be significant for individuals with ADHD (43).

L-Carnitine:  Plays a critical role in fatty acid metabolism and mitochondrial health.  Has been shown to reduce hyperactivity and improve social behavior in people with ADHD (44).

Serine:  Phosphatidylserine (PS) has been shown to increase dopamine levels.  Research has shown that taking PS with omega 3 fatty acids improved ADHD scores significantly more than when taking just one of these alone.  The researchers found it especially useful in the population of hyperactive-impulsive, emotionally and behaviorally-dysregulated individuals.

L-Glutamine:  This is the precurser for the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA.  Glutamate is excitatory while GABA is inhibitory and calming.  Disruption in the glutamate, GABA balance may be present in individuals with ADHD (45).  Additionally, L-glutamine helps improve gut integrity and reduces microbial related inflammation in the body that can effect brain function and induce ADHD.

Vitamin D3:  Vitamin D3 plays an enormous role in the development and function of the brain.  There is a strong association between low prenatal vitamin D levels in the mother and ADHD development in children (46).  Individuals with ADHD are often found to have low vitamin D levels as well (47).

Glutathione and ADHD:

Individuals suffering with ADHD are under high levels of oxidative stress in their brain.  Our main protective shield is the master anti-oxidant glutathione.  Poor blood sugar control and high environmental toxin exposure are known to deplete glutathione levels and impair mitochondrial function (48).

A key pathway that maintains cellular glutathione levels and the ability of the cell to adapt to stress is called Keap1-Nrf2.  When this pathway breaks down it causes increased levels of oxidative stress within the cell that leads to the glutathione depletion and mitochondrial dysfunction (49).  Improving glutathione status in ADHD individuals improves hyperactivity and focus.

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Chiropractic and ADHD:

Healthy movement patterns produce proprioception (movement information) which is a critical essential for healthy brain enhancing and neurodevelopmental patterns.  Boosting proprioceptive input through good posture and spinal function is critical for healthy brain development.

Regular chiropractic care along with spinal hygiene exercises are essential lifestyle factors for healthy neurological function.  This article explains the benefits and reviews specific case studies involving chiropractic care for children with ADHD and sensory learning disorders (50).

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Healthy Movement Patterns:

Children, teenagers, & adults with ADHD symptoms do very well with a regular exercise program that incorporates core stability and functional balance training. Many hyperactive kids are naturally drawn to activities such as rebounding and jumping on a trampoline as well as balance sports such as skating, surfing and snowboarding.

All of these dynamic balance based activities powerfully enhance proprioceptive input into the brain.  Regular movement and daily exercise are also extremely beneficial for people with ADHD (51).

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12 Tips to Beat ADHD Naturally:

Here are the best action steps to get started with on your journey to beat ADHD and other learning problems naturally.  You should always consult with your physician before stopping or changing medications or taking on new health strategies.

Additionally, you should be working with a functional health practitioner to help guide you through these strategies.  This is not an exhaustive list and there are other natural therapeutic strategies that I and functional health practitioners will utilize to help individuals with ADHD and other learning disorders.

1.  Prioritize Sleep:  You must focus on getting good sleep on a regular basis.  If you are sleeping in late in the morning, try getting up early and allowing yourself to get real tired early the following evening and going to sleep around 9-10pm and waking around 6-7am.

Use this as your regular schedule getting 8-9 hours of high quality sleep each night.  If you are having trouble sleeping follow the strategies I discuss in these articles here

2.  Clean Up Your Diet:  Follow an Anti-inflammatory nutrition plan as discussed.  You can find specific shopping plans here and many great recipes on DrJockers.com

3.  Get Outside on a Regular Basis:  It is so important to get outside in nature.  Go to a park everyday and take a long walk and do lots of deep breathing.  Nature is its own healer and if you find ways to get out in nature, you will see huge improvements in focus, concentration, learning and mood.

4.  Exercise Daily:  Bike, walk, run, lift weights, dance, yoga, etc.  Find something or multiple things you love that challenge your body and are enjoyable.

5.  Supplement With Omega 3’s:  Omega 3 fatty acids may be the most important supplement for individuals with ADHD and learning disorders.  Try to eat foods like grass-fed meat, grass-fed butter, wild-caught fish and spirulina which are all rich in high quality omega 3’s.

It is also advisable to supplement with 2-5 grams daily of EPA/DHA along with 200 mg of GLA.  Clinically, I use ProEFA or Cod Liver Oil to boost up omega 3’s.

6.  Breath Deeply:  Take time to practice deep diaphragmatic breathing on a regular basis.

7.  Chiropractic Care:  Find a great chiropractor in your area for a complete spine and nervous system evaluation and follow the recommended treatment protocols.

8.  Eliminate Food Sensitivities:  Identify any major food sensitivities through either a lab test here or biofeedback test here and come off of these for 90 days.

9.  Include Magnesium & B Vitamin Rich Foods:  Magnesium helps to improve blood sugar signaling patterns and protects the blood-brain barrier.  The best magnesium and B vitamin rich foods include dark green leafy veggies, grass-fed dairy, raw cacao and pumpkin seeds.   I also recommend using our Brain Calm Magnesium for ADHD children and adults.

10.  Optimize Vitamin D:  Boost your vitamin D3 levels by getting more whole body sun exposure and/or using a high quality supplement.  I recommend a D3 with vitamin K2.  Aim to get 5,000-10,000 IU daily for adults and 2,000 to 5,000 IU daily for children.  I use the Thorne D3/K2 dropper to titer the dosage for kids.

11.  Improve Your Gut Motility:  Improving bowel movement frequency and consistency is a key detoxification concept.  Consuming an anti-inflammatory diet with good fiber sources such as  chia seed and flax seed, using bone broths, fermented foods and probiotics will improve bowel motility.  Restore harmony to your gut through diet and proper supplementation.

12.  Use an Advanced Brain Support Pack:  This is designed to get you the key nutrients that are we have already discussed that are necessary for optimal brain function and cognitive processing.  These nutrients help the brain to produce the right amount of neurotransmitters and other neurochemicals to enhance focus, memory and concentration naturally.  You can find our Children’s Brain support pack here

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Kids are getting sicker every year. The Telegraph newspaper in London recently stated that children’s cancers are up 40% in the last 16 years. And it becomes harder every day to know how to do the best for them.

That’s where the “My Healthy Child” online event may be able to help you.

WHY SHOULD YOU BE INTERESTED?

This event brings together 21 experts for interviews about how THEY bring up their children and what they recommend you do with your little ones. All interviews are being streamed free of charge for seven days from July 20th to 26th..

Although most of these experts are very well known, many had never agreed to be interviewed on this subject before. They will share their tips and strategies for bringing up their own children on the right path. It’s called “My Healthy Child” and it’s coming on July 20th.

The “My Healthy Child” Event Will Teach You:

How to deal with earaches, pink eye and other everyday conditions

How to help children with self-belief issues

Giving your child the very best chance of avoiding cancer

How vitamin C can literally change your life

How to select a good pediatrician

My Healthy Child is online and free from July 20 to 26, 2017!

Don’t miss my presentation on Day 4:  July 23rd where I discuss how my wife and I work with our boys in improving their ability to adapt to stress.

Sources For This Article Include:

  1. CDC – New Data: Medication and Behavior Treatment Link Here
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  16. Edden RA, Crocetti D, Zhu H, Gilbert DL, Mostofsky SH. Reduced GABA concentration in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;69(7):750-3. PMID: 22752239
  17. Sprung J, Flick RP, Katusic SK, et al. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder After Early Exposure to Procedures Requiring General Anesthesia. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2012;87(2):120-129.
  18. Yu CK, Yuen VM, Wong GT, Irwin MG. The effects of anaesthesia on the developing brain: a summary of the clinical evidence. F1000Res. 2013 Aug 2;2:166. PMID: 24358896
  19. DiMaggio C, Sun LS, Li G. Early childhood exposure to anesthesia and risk of developmental and behavioral disorders in a sibling birth cohort. Anesth Analg. 2011 Nov;113(5):1143-51. PMID: 21415431
  20. The Relationship Between AD/HD and Perinatal (Oxytocin) Pitocin Induction: Risk for Developmental Adversity? Link Here
  21. Advokat C, Scheithauer M. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulant medications as cognitive enhancers. Front Neurosci. 2013 May 29;7:82. PMID: 23754970
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  24. DEA – Drug Schedules Link Here
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  26. Holden JM, Meyers-Manor JE, Overmier JB, Gahtan E, Sweeney W, Miller H. Lipopolysaccharide-induced immune activation impairs attention but has little effect on short-term working memory. Behav Brain Res. 2008 Dec 12;194(2):138-45. PMID: 18655807
  27. Kanarek RB. Artificial food dyes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Nutr Rev. 2011 Jul;69(7):385-91. PMID: 21729092
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  29. The Lancet – Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial Link Here
  30. Niederhofer H. Association of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Celiac Disease: A Brief Report. The Primary Care Companion to CNS Disorders. 2011;13(3):10br01104.
  31. Martí LF. Effectiveness of nutritional interventions on the functioning of children with ADHD and/or ASD. An updated review of research evidence. Bol Asoc Med P R. 2010 Oct-Dec;102(4):31-42. PMID: 21766545
  32. Bélanger SA, Vanasse M, Spahis S, et al. Omega-3 fatty acid treatment of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Paediatrics & Child Health. 2009;14(2):89-98.
  33. Crupi R, Marino A, Cuzzocrea S. n-3 fatty acids: role in neurogenesis and neuroplasticity. Curr Med Chem. 2013;20(24):2953-63. PMID: 23746276
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  35. Burgess JR, Stevens L, Zhang W, Peck L. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Jan;71(1 Suppl):327S-30S. PMID: 10617991
  36. Starobrat-Hermelin B, Kozielec T. The effects of magnesium physiological supplementation on hyperactivity in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Positive response to magnesium oral loading test. Magnes Res. 1997 Jun;10(2):149-56. PMID: 9368236
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  45. Glutamate/glutamine and neuronal integrity in adults with ADHD: a proton MRS study Link Here
  46. Morales E, Julvez J, Torrent M, Ballester F, Rodríguez-Bernal CL, Andiarena A, Vegas O, Castilla AM, Rodriguez-Dehli C, Tardón A, Sunyer J. Vitamin D in Pregnancy and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder-like Symptoms in Childhood. Epidemiology. 2015 Jul;26(4):458-65. PMID: 25867115
  47. Vitamin D status in children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Pediatr Int. 2014 Aug;56(4):515-9. PMID: 24417979
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  51. Halperin JM, Berwid OG, O’Neill S. Healthy body, healthy mind?: the effectiveness of physical activity to treat ADHD in children. Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2014 Oct;23(4):899-936. PMID: 25220093

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The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently surveyed 73,000 children and found one in 10 has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).This is a 22% increase since 2003. Research has shown that toxic and deficient lifestyle patterns are the chief contributing factor for this disorder.Natural lifestyle solutions can prevent and reverse ADHD.

Many researchers consider chronic ADHD symptoms a sign of mild-moderate brain damage.When regions of the brain are chronically inflamed it signals the primitive regions of the brain to be on overdrive.This inhibits frontal lobe function which is the region responsible for concentration and emotional stability.The primitive regions on overdrive include the reticular activating system and limbic system.When this primitive brain is imbalanced it leads to poor concentration and emotional outbursts.

ADHD is commonly caused by an inflammatory based diet and toxic food additives.These food additive chemicals are mild-moderately neurotoxic.They also have a strong synergistic affect when combined with sugars such as fructose.A recent Lancet study concluded that food dyes along with the preservative sodium benzoate (found in many soft drinks, fruit juices, & salad dressings) cause many children to become significantly more hyperactive and distractible.This study also found that food additives and dyes can do as much damage to children’s brains as lead in gasoline.

Digestive problems can also dramatically affect brain function and development.A common factor with ADHD is a weak intestinal system and food allergies.Often times a Candida infection is present and producing brain damaging toxic metabolites.It is wise to address the gut and allow it to heal by avoiding allergens and supplementing with high quality Probiotics.

The most common food allergens to avoid include all pasteurized dairy products and gluten containing grains such as wheat, barley, rye, oats, kamut, & spelt.Soy products, some nuts, eggs, and heavy proteins are often not tolerated well.Other allergens include those of the nightshade family such as eggplant, tomatoes, & potatoes.

An anti-inflammatory diet and lifestyle are critical for full recovery from this condition.Anti-inflammatory foods help to modulate the immune system and give it a more accurate pair of eyes so as to not over-inflame when stimulated.To effectively de-inflame it is key to completely avoiding man-made foods, sugars, and food allergens as listed above.The long chain omega 3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are critical for brain function.

Healthy movement patterns produce proprioception (movement information) which is a critical essential for healthy brain enhancing and neurodevelopmental patterns.Boosting proprioceptive input through good posture and spinal function is critical for healthy brain development.Regular chiropractic care along with spinal hygiene exercises are essential lifestyle factors for healthy neurological function.

Children, teenagers, & adults with ADHD symptoms do very well with a regular exercise program that incorporates core stability and functional balance training. Many hyperactive kids are naturally drawn to activities such as rebounding and jumping on a trampoline as well as balance sports such as skating, surfing and snowboarding.All of these dynamic balance based activities powerfully enhance proprioceptive input into the brain.

Other critical nutrients that are key for brain function include Vitamin D, Folic acid, Pyridoxine (B6), Vitamin B12, Zinc, CoQ10, and trace minerals.Vitamin D levels should be between 60-100 ng/ml.Boost Vitamin D naturally with 20-60 minutes of healthy sunlight everyday or 5,000-50,000 IU of emulsified vitamin D3 daily to get the levels where they should be.A raw, whole-food multi-vitamin that supplies ample amounts of folic acid (400 mcg), B6 (4mg), B12(100 mcg), Zinc (15 mg), trace minerals, & CoQ10 (500 mcg) should be consumed daily.

Read this Article Published in NaturalNews:

http://www.naturalnews.com/032275_ADHD_natural_remedies.htmlThe U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently surveyed 73,000 children and found one in 10 has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).   This is a 22% increase since 2003.  Research has shown that toxic and deficient lifestyle patterns are the chief contributing factor for this disorder.  Natural lifestyle solutions can prevent and reverse ADHD.

Many researchers consider chronic ADHD symptoms a sign of mild-moderate brain damage.  When regions of the brain are chronically inflamed it signals the primitive regions of the brain to be on overdrive.  This inhibits frontal lobe function which is the region responsible for concentration and emotional stability.  The primitive regions on overdrive include the reticular activating system and limbic system.   When this primitive brain is imbalanced it leads to poor concentration and emotional outbursts.

 

ADHD is commonly caused by an inflammatory based diet and toxic food additives. These food additive chemicals are mild-moderately neurotoxic.  They also have a strong synergistic affect when combined with sugars such as fructose.  A recent Lancet study concluded that food dyes along with the preservative sodium benzoate (found in many soft drinks, fruit juices, & salad dressings) cause many children to become significantly more hyperactive and distractible.  This study also found that food additives and dyes can do as much damage to children’s brains as lead in gasoline.

 

Digestive problems can also dramatically affect brain function and development.  A common factor with ADHD is a weak intestinal system and food allergies.  Often times a Candida infection is present and producing brain damaging toxic metabolites.  It is wise to address the gut and allow it to heal by avoiding allergens and supplementing with high quality Probiotics.

 

The most common food allergens to avoid include all pasteurized dairy products and gluten containing grains such as wheat, barley, rye, oats, kamut, & spelt.  Soy products, some nuts, eggs, and heavy proteins are often not tolerated well.  Other allergens include those of the nightshade family such as eggplant, tomatoes, & potatoes.

 

An anti-inflammatory diet and lifestyle are critical for full recovery from this condition. Anti-inflammatory foods help to modulate the immune system and give it a more accurate pair of eyes so as to not over-inflame when stimulated.  To effectively de-inflame it is key to completely avoiding man-made foods, sugars, and food allergens as listed above.   The long chain omega 3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are critical for brain function.

 

Healthy movement patterns produce proprioception (movement information) which is a critical essential for healthy brain enhancing and neurodevelopmental patterns.  Boosting proprioceptive input through good posture and spinal function is critical for healthy brain development.  Regular chiropractic care along with spinal hygiene exercises are essential lifestyle factors for healthy neurological function.

Children, teenagers, & adults with ADHD symptoms do very well with a regular exercise program that incorporates core stability and functional balance training. Many hyperactive kids are naturally drawn to activities such as rebounding and jumping on a trampoline as well as balance sports such as skating, surfing and snowboarding.  All of these dynamic balance based activities powerfully enhance proprioceptive input into the brain.

Other critical nutrients that are key for brain function include Vitamin D, Folic acid, Pyridoxine (B6), Vitamin B12, Zinc, CoQ10, and trace minerals.  Vitamin D levels should be between 60-100 ng/ml.  Boost Vitamin D naturally with 20-60 minutes of healthy sunlight everyday or 5,000-50,000 IU of emulsified vitamin D3 daily to get the levels where they should be.  A raw, whole-food multi-vitamin that supplies ample amounts of folic acid (400 mcg), B6 (4mg), B12(100 mcg), Zinc (15 mg), trace minerals, & CoQ10 (500 mcg) should be consumed daily.

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6 Responses to 12 Strategies to Beat ADHD Naturally

  1. Michael January 23, 2013 at 11:18 am #

    Hi I am a 49 year old adult with ADD I was diagnosed at age 7, you have some good information on this page and these supplement do help. You may want to take a look at this website http://www.phosadd.com concerning phosphates In are diet. Hertha Heffer a German scientist and researcher discovered 30 years ago the link between excess phosphates in are western diet and ADD her research was done with love as her son has ADD. I believe her finding are viable because I have tested a low phosphate diet on my self an it worked.

    Cheers Michael

  2. Dr Jockers January 23, 2013 at 11:23 am #

    Thanks for writing Michael. That is a great recommendation. Dietary phosphates can be problematic!

  3. stenelle bREWER July 14, 2016 at 9:30 pm #

    Thank you so much for your knowledge! I used to wounder why kids always made fun of me and why I never felt I could measure up. I have been on a journey of health ever since learning how to get off my meds . my self using a book called Potatoes or prozac. it has been a wonderful but challenging journey. Your knowledge has been a very beneficial part of the journey! Thank you from the bottom of my heart!!!
    Joyfully, Stenelle Brewer

    • Dr. Jockers July 15, 2016 at 4:48 pm #

      Thank you Stenelle! Glad you are reading and using the info! Many Blessings!

  4. Gabi April 28, 2017 at 2:03 am #

    Which foods are good for adhd?

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