The 3 Biggest Steps for Healthy Hormones

The 3 Biggest Steps for Healthy Hormones

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The 3 Biggest Steps for Healthy Hormones:

Hormone dysfunction is at an all-time high.  The symptoms of such include dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation), infertility, lowered libido, uterine fibroids, fibrocystic breast disease, chronic headaches, fatigue, insomnia, menopausal problems, hot flashes, weight gain, etc.  Long-term when these dysfunctions are not corrected they lead to major cancers such as breast, uterine & ovarian for women and prostate & colon for men.

Typical medical treatments such as birth control pills for younger women dealing with menstrual problems, infertility treatments and hormone replacement have all been shown to dramatically increase the risk of cancer (1, 2, 3, 4).  Bio identical hormone replacement is a much better option; however, it only addresses the symptom by increasing hormones from the outside-in.

What Needs to Be Addressed?:

The most important question that needs to be addressed is:  Why are my hormones unbalanced and what do I do to improve their function?  In my years of experience working with hundreds of individuals with these problems, I have found the answer is a combination of toxicity and deficiency.

Environmental toxins wreak havoc upon our bodies’ hormones and deficiencies in critical fatty acids and key detoxifying nutrients result in an abundance of synthetic hormones masquerading as the real thing.  Our body has challenges adjusting to this and the various symptoms are a result.

The following steps are extremely important and will dramatically benefit your health.  However, some individuals have such damage to their hormonal systems they will need further testing and recommendations to correct the cause and balance their hormones  naturally.  One of the tests I use is our Female Comprehensive Plus, which analyzes the estrogen quotient as well as stress hormone balance, progesterone and testosterone levels.

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The 3 Biggest Changes:

There are many things we could discuss in way of hormone health and lifestyle change.  Here are three of the most important steps to take.

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1. Change the Meat You Eat:

Typical commercialized meat, dairy & poultry are loaded with anti-biotics, synthetic hormones and pesticides and other toxic chemicals.  They are also loaded with inflammatory omega 6 fats and are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids (5).  The net accumulation is massively toxic and destructive to hormone function.   The synthetic hormones act to mimic estrogen except they do not act the same in the body.

Expert Analysis:  Stay away from grain-fed beef, all pork/pig products, processed chicken, turkey, eggs & farmed fish.  Stick with 100% grass-fed beef, bison, buffalo, lamb, & venison.  100% grass-fed raw goat & cow cheese is great.  Organic free-range chicken, turkey, eggs and duck are all great.  Stay away from any processed meat (even if it says natural) that contains a bunch of chemicals and preservatives in the ingredient list.

Vital Info:  Investing in healthy animal products is essential for you health and for the health of the entire world.  Commercialized animal farms are highly destructive because they massively pollute the planet and are not sustainable   These farms also practice cruel and tortuous treatment.  Good farms that feed animals grass and allow them free roaming are sustainable and healthy.  Grass-fed animal products are extremely beneficial for overall health.

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Where Do You Find Organic Meats?

You can find organic and grass-fed meats at various farmers markets and health food stores.  It is always great to support local farmers in your area who are raising their animals properly and sustainably.

If you are in an area where you don’t have access to health food stores or local farmers who are raising healthy animals than I would suggest ordering products from US Wellness Meats or Slankers.  These are farms who use organic and grass-fed practices and offer a wide variety of favorite cuts, sausages, cheeses, bison/buffalo, lamb, high omega 3 chicken, etc.

My wife and I get our products from our local farmer but we also make a monthly order through US Wellness meats or Slankers for harder to find products.

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2.  Eat More Cruciferous Veggies:

Cruciferous veggies are loaded with indole-3 carbonyl (I3C) which binds and eliminates toxic xenoestrogenic chemicals that interfere with healthy hormone function (6, 7).  These veggies include kale, collard greens, broccoli, cauliflower, mustard greens, watercress, & brussel sprouts among others

Expert Analysis:   Be sure to lightly steam or marinate cruciferous veggies before eating.  When you steam the veggies it binds to goitrogens (thyroid blocking nutrients) and it breaks down the tough outer cellulose that is challenging to digest.  Lightly steaming maintains a very high percentage of original nutrients while making the veggie more digestible & bioavailable.

I personally love to have steamed broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts with grass-fed butter or ghee (clarified butter) melted on it.  The butter and ghee provide tons of healthy fats, fat soluble anti-oxidants and brain enhancing nutrients like choline and phosphatydlserine.  You can read more about the benefits of butter and ghee here

Vital Info:  Cruciferous veggies also contain phenyl isothiocynates and sulfuraphane which are extremely powerful anti-carcinogenic molecules.  These vegetables are some of nature’s best defense against environmental toxicity.  The best form is cruciferous sprouts, so I recommend consuming broccoli or kale sprouts on a daily basis.  Simply add some to a salad each day.

Even if you have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and struggle to digest cruciferous veggies, you can get all the benefits from a mouthful of sprouts each day without the potential digestive problems that come from the fermentable fibers.

3. Get Rid of Plastic

Plastic contains harmful xenoestrogenic chemicals such as BPA and many others (8).   Plastic leaches these dangerous toxins into water and oil and anything you would cook in plastic.

Expert Analysis:  Minimize exposure to plastic all together.  Try to use glass first or stainless steel second when looking for something to put water in.  Buy all of your oils (coconut and olive oil) in a glass container.

Get a clean glass carrying bottle and fill it up with clean, filtered water and bring it with you when you leave the house.  Also, be sure to drink out of glasses in the house and never plastic.

Vital Info:  When forced to use a plastic water bottle be sure to look for one that has minimal chemicals and is BPA free.  Some of these bottles can even be reused if necessary.

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Sources For This Article Include:

  1. Beaber EF, Buist DS, Barlow WE, Malone KE, Reed SD, Li CI. Recent oral contraceptive use by formulation and breast cancer risk among women 20 to 49 years of age. Cancer Res. 2014 Aug 1;74(15):4078-89. PMID: 25085875
  2. Beaber EF, Malone KE, Tang MT, Barlow WE, Porter PL, Daling JR, Li CI. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk overall and by molecular subtype among young women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 May;23(5):755-64. PMID: 24633144
  3. Thomas DB. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer: review of the epidemiologic literature. Contraception. 1991 Jun;43(6):597-642. PMID: 1868735
  4. CDC – Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals. Link Here
  5. Daley CA, Abbott A, Doyle PS, Nader GA, Larson S. A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef. Nutrition Journal. 2010;9:10.
  6. Davis DL, Bradlow HL, Wolff M, Woodruff T, Hoel DG, Anton-Culver H. Medical hypothesis: xenoestrogens as preventable causes of breast cancer. Environmental Health Perspectives. 1993;101(5):372-377.
  7. Michnovicz JJ, Adlercreutz H, Bradlow HL. Changes in levels of urinary estrogen metabolites after oral indole-3-carbinol treatment in humans. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 May 21;89(10):718-23. PMID: 9168187
  8. Meeker JD, Sathyanarayana S, Swan SH. Phthalates and other additives in plastics: human exposure and associated health outcomes. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2009;364(1526):2097-2113.

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