Mimosa Pudica –  The Most Powerful Herb for Parasites?

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Mimosa pudicaMimosa Pudica –  The Most Powerful Herb for Parasites?

Intestinal parasites are real and they can do major damage in the human body. I often find that individuals I work with who are struggling to get well have a lingering gut infection involving some type of parasite. Parasites are tricky to eradicate from the body as they have a long reproduction cycle and clever protection mechanisms. When parasites linger for long enough they cause a number of health complications. Luckily, a powerful herb (and its seeds) called Mimosa Pudica has a remarkable ability to eradicate these worms.

You will soon understand my interest in Mimosa Pudica, and also why you and your loved ones should consider adding this little powerhouse of protection to your wellness protocol, targeting the very root of all diseases – a toxic, parasite-infected gut.

These organisms are masters of subterfuge, sabotaging our health while hiding undetected. The symptoms of parasite infestation mimic our most common ailments and often, a lack of detection can lead to unneeded medical treatment. Oftentimes prescribed treatments are aimed at non-related conditions and end up leaving the parasites intact and able to dig in deeper.

What is Mimosa Pudica?

This “sensitive” plant, also called touch-me-not or shy plant, is a creeping, flowering bush-type herb of the pea/legume family. Originally native to South, Central and North America – it is now also a pantropical weed found in Asian countries including Bangladesh, Thailand, India, Nepal, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Japan, Taiwan, Sri Lanka and Guam (1).

This unusual plant is often grown for its curiosity value: the gentle, small leaves fold inward and droop when touched or shaken, defending themselves from harm, and re-open a few minutes later. Such rapid plant movement is seen in several plants and occurs quickly – usually under one second. The Venus Flytrap is a well-known example of rapid plant movement (2). Mimosa pudica, in particular, closes in darkness and reopens in the light.

There are theories about how Mimosa pudica “learns” its behavior since it, like all plants, lacks a brain and nervous system. However, neither hypothesis has gained scientific acceptance; and more research is needed to determine the cause of this interesting learning capability.

More History on Mimosa Pudica

The list of health challenges that have historically benefited from Mimosa pudica is interesting and varied. Indian Ayuverdic medicine, a holistic system of health over 3,000 years old, prescribes Mimosa for a variety of health remedies including dysentery, leprosy. Jaundice, asthma, uterine problems, blood diseases, fatigue and more (3).

More modern day uses for this plant include :
  • Anti-venom: Water extracts of the roots of Mimosa pudica have shown to have significant anti-venom activity, most notably against the lethal venom of the monocled cobra. It appears to inhibit the myotoxicity and enzyme activity of cobra venom (4).
  • Wound healing
  • Helps relieve the pain of hemorrhoids and piles
  • Anti-depressant, anti-anxiety
  • Soothes ulcers
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Treats indigestion and diarrhea
  • Anti-microbial, anti-fungal, anti-viral properties
  • Anti-parasite
  • Lessens joint pain and arthritis symptoms

While all parts of the plant are beneficial for a variety of health issues, for this article we are focusing on the seeds. Mimosa pudica seeds consist of a very gooey, sticky fat-soluble material that adheres to everything and helps to support the entire intestinal tract.

Chemical Constituents of Mimosa pudica

Phytochemical screening of the “touch-me-not” plant leaf extract showed the presence of flavonoids, glycosides, terpenoids, alkaloids, coumarins, saponins, tannins, phenols and quinines. The root extract showed the presence of fatty acids, glycosides, essential oils, tannins, amino acids, alkaloids, phytosterol, and flavonoids. Some of the important phytochemical compounds isolated from the Mimosa pudica plant are mimosine, jasmonic acid, betulinic acid, stigmasterol, Beta-sitosterol, 2-hyrdoxymethyl-chroman-4-one, dimethyl ammonium salt and mimopudine (5).

It majorly possesses antibacterial, antivenom, antifertility, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, aphrodisiac, and various other pharmacological activities. The herb has been used traditionally for ages, in the treatment of urogenital disorders, piles, dysentery, sinus, and also applied on wounds (6).

[NOTE: Contraindication: Because of its proven anti-fertility properties, Mimosa Pudica should never be consumed by a woman trying to become pregnant. Also, pregnant women should not consume Mimosa pudica.]

Mimosa Pudica and Gut Health

I wrote above that our interest in Mimosa pudica was primarily in its effectiveness as a potent natural anti-parasite treatment. There are several proven, herbal and holistic remedies for parasite infestation and overall gut health. Mimosa pudica seeds, in particular, seem to stand-out in this regard.

Intestinal parasites are abnormal and unwanted inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract that have proven to cause an alarming array of health problems, some of them very serious, to their host. Parasites devour nutrients from the foods we eat, contributing to chronic malnourishment. They can also eat holes in the intestinal wall, leading to leaky gut which introduces an array of serious health challenges. One of the major complications with leaky gut is autoimmunity and conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and inflammatory skin conditions. Humans can play host to more than a hundred different types of parasites.

If you have been making all of the right choices to get healthy and you seem to be dealing with chronic digestive issues or just can’t figure out why you feel unwell, there is the potential for parasite infection. Running a stool analysis like a GI MAP is a quick and powerful way to determine if you are dealing with a parasite.

Parasitic Characteristics

Parasites can range from microscopic amoeba to 10-foot-long tapeworms. These parasites and their eggs can enter the circulation and travel to various organs such as the liver where they can contribute to abscesses and cirrhosis (78).  They can also migrate to the lungs causing pneumonia; and into the joints, brain, muscles, esophagus, and skin where they cause elevated inflammation (9).

Chronic parasitic infections are linked with intestinal permeability and leaky gut syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, irregular bowel movements, malabsorption, gastritis, acid reflux, skin disorders, joint pain, seasonal and food allergies and decreased immunity (10). Using something like mimosa pudica can help to bind and pull out parasites before these issues take place or to help releive them.

Symptoms of Parasites in Humans

Many people don’t associate chronic or “normal” health problems with parasites. But the fact is, the presence of parasites should be considered if one or more of these symptoms persist over time:

  1. Constipation or diarrhea
  2. Gas or bloating
  3. Back, joint and/or muscles aches and pain
  4. Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  5. Allergies
  6. Increased appetite and often excess weight
  7. Itchy ears, nose or anus
  8. Nervousness or irritability
  9. Chronic fatigue, lethargy or apathy
  10. Various skin problems
  11. Anemia
  12. Forgetfulness and mental fog
  13. Vision problems
  14. Sleep difficulties

How Do We Get Parasites?

Parasites are everywhere. Typically, they are associated with third-world countries, but those of us who live in the United States are not immune. We get them from contaminated food and water, improperly cooked meat, and unclean fruits and vegetables. Restaurant salad bars can be breeding grounds for parasites as well. You can even get them by walking barefoot as they are transmitted through the soil. They can also be sexually transmitted or contracted through contaminated blood and feces (11).

Tiny parasitic eggs can be transmitted from person to person through improper hygiene practices such as neglecting to wash your hands after using the restroom. These eggs can be on any surface – door handles, tables, money and much more.

In most cases, parasites – like other disease-causing organisms such as viruses and bacteria – enter our bodies because of a weakened immune system. Unnecessary use of antibiotics, a poorly established gut flora, poor diet, and chronic stress can all predispose use to infection.

If you find yourself subjected to several of these risk factors, then you may consider using mimosa pudica on a regular basis as a defensive measure.

Types of Parasites

There are three main classes of parasites that can cause disease in humans: protozoa, helminths, and ectoparasites.

Protozoa are microscopic, one-celled organisms that can be free-living or parasitic in nature. They can reproduce in humans, which contributes to their survival and also permits serious infections to develop from just a single organism.

Helminths are large, multicellular organisms that can be seen with the naked eye in their adult stage. Like protozoa, helminths can be either free-living or parasitic in nature. In their adult form, helminths cannot multiply in humans. There are three main groups of helminths; they typically are unable to multiply in the human gut:

  • Flatworms (platyhelminths) – these include the trematodes (flukes) and cestodes (tapeworms).
  • Thorny-headed worms (acanthocephalans) – the adult forms reside in the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Roundworms (nematodes) – these worms can live in the gastrointestinal tract, blood, lymphatic system or subcutaneous tissues.

Ectoparasites can broadly include blood-sucking arthropods such as mosquitoes. However, this term is generally used to refer to organisms such as ticks, fleas, lice, and mites that attach or burrow into the skin and remain there for relatively long periods of time (e.g., weeks to months).

Arthropods cause diseases in their own right, but are even more important as vectors, or transmitters, of many different pathogens that, in turn, result in tremendous mortality from the diseases they cause. Case in point – malaria, transmitted by mosquitos – causes massive loss of life worldwide (12).

The Heart-Parasite Connection

Lest we think that ignoring the diagnosis and treatment of parasites is of no great consequence, consider that worms in humans have been clinically related to serious heart diseases as well as to cancer, particularly bladder cancer. Chagas’ disease is one infection in particular caused by a protozoan parasite called Trypanosoma cruzi.

Due to increased travel, parasitic infestation formerly seen primarily in developing tropical countries is now diagnosed worldwide. Some parasites may directly or indirectly affect the heart, with infections manifested as myocarditis, pericarditis, pancarditis, or pulmonary hypertension. As a consequence, medical clinicians now routinely consider testing for parasites in the diagnosis of myocardial and pericardial diseases anywhere around the world (13).

Mimosa Pudica for Parasites

The evidence is building to support the use of Mimosa pudica to destroy parasites. This evidence is reaffirmed clinically, as those who use it (even without previous symptoms of parasite infection) begin to see worms in their stool.

CellCore Biosciences™ developed PARA 1 as a tool for immune and GI system support against parasites. It is especially helpful for reducing the levels of helminths and nematodes, the larger sized worms. As described earlier in this article, the sticky substance extracted from Mimosa pudica seeds is a powerful agent for extracting parasites and pathogens in the intestinal tract. There are no side effects and no adverse reactions have taken place with dosages as high as 20 capsules daily.

Our recommended dosage is 2 caps – 2x daily. For sensitive individuals, start with 1 cap daily for a week to let the body adjust; slowly add 1 cap per week until you reach the desired dosage. As any parasites slowly die off and begin exiting the body, it is possible to feel a little under the weather, simply as a part of the detoxification, healing process. This is normal and to be expected. Using something like BioToxin Binder or Activated Charcoal can help bind and reduce any symptoms associated with a die-off.

mimosa pudica Para 1

Frequently Asked Questions:

Is all Mimosa pudica fat soluble?
No. The mimosa pudica plant itself is not fat soluble. The mimosa pudica seed is fat soluble. CellCore Biosciences™ is the exclusive distributor of mimosa pudica seed.

Why is Para 1: Immune & Digestive Support fat soluble?
The mimosa pudica seed is fat soluble. CellCore Biosciences is the exclusive distributor of mimosa pudica seed. All other companies sell the plant portion, not the seed.

Is this organic?
Yes, Mimosa Pudica is USDA Organic. Certified Organic by: Vedic Organic Certification Agency.

What is the recommended dosage?
Take 2 capsules twice daily on an empty stomach or as otherwise directed by a healthcare professional.

What can I take with Mimosa Pudica?
Mimosa Pudica is best taken away from food, carbon and diatomaceous earth. Mimosa Pudica can be taken with other supplements and herbs.

Is what I see in my stool the mimosa herb?
No. Not everyone sees changes in the presentation of their stools.

Is it allergen free, gluten free, etc?
Mimosa Pudica contains No fillers, No additives, No excipients, is Gluten Free, GMO-free, Organic, corn free, soy free and nut free.

Is it safe for kids?
Please consult a healthcare professional for use with children.

Is it safe for animals?
Please consult a healthcare professional for use with animals.

Sources for this Article Include:

1. Amador-Vargas, S., Dominguez, M., León, G. et al. Plant Ecol (2014) 215: 1445. DOI: 10.1007/s11258-014-0401-4
2. Wikipedia: Rapid Plant Movement (LINK)
3. HolisticZine: Traditional and Medicinal Uses of Mimosa Pudica (LINK)
4. Mahanta M, Mukherjee AK. Neutralisation of lethality, myotoxicity and toxic enzymes of Naja kaouthia venom by Mimosa pudica root extracts. J Ethnopharmacol. 2001;75(1):55-60.PMID: 11282444
5. Wild Turmeric: 15 Top Medicinal Uses & Benefits of Mimosa Pudica (LINK)
6. Ahmad H, Sehgal S, Mishra A, Gupta R. Mimosa pudica L. (Laajvanti): An overview. Pharmacogn Rev. 2012;6(12):115-24. PMID: 23055637
7. Medline Plus: Amebic Liver Abscess (LINK)
8. Sekiya C. [Parasitic cirrhosis of the liver]. Nippon Rinsho. 1994;52(1):234-9. PMID: 8114299
9. Zaccone P, Fehervari Z, Phillips JM, Dunne DW, Cooke A. Parasitic worms and inflammatory diseases. Parasite Immunol. 2006;28(10):515-23. PMID: 16965287
10. MD Heal – Foundation for Integrated Medicine: Intestinal Parasites, Bacterial Dysbiosis, and Leaky Gut (LINK)
11. Nutrition MBA: Mimosa Pudica for Parasites (LINK)
12. CDC: About Parasites (LINK)
13. Hidron A, Vogenthaler N, Santos-preciado JI, Rodriguez-morales AJ, Franco-paredes C, Rassi A. Cardiac involvement with parasitic infections. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2010;23(2):324-49.PMID: 20375355

 

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Comments

  1. I am hoping to ‘someday’ be pregnant again. I suspect that among other health issues, I probably have parasites. I am looking to eliminate them and improve my health. I see, though, that this is not recommended for pregnant women, nursing women or those trying to become pregnant. What I’m wondering is –
    -Is mimosa pudica seed safe for a woman of childbearing age, who is hoping to someday (like 6 months from now or 1 year from now) to become pregnant? Are the anti-fertility effects permanent? Or is it just while taking the seeds?
    -If mimosa pudica seed is just definitely not recommended for someone who is hoping to ever be pregnant someday, then what is a safe natural effective product/herb that I could take to eliminate parasites, without the antifertility effects?
    Thanks so much!

    1. They are not permanent effects, but I wouldn’t take this during the process of trying to get pregnant. Always best to eliminate parasites before hand and then she will be much more fertile.

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